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Short on posts

Posted in Uncategorized on July 9th, 2011 by Chris

Just wanted to leave a quick note and let you know I’m still around … I am short on time recently. We just got back from camping and will turn right around for another vacation soon. Plus, while we were packing for camping the electricity in the barn went out and the car got a flat. So, two days back from camping and the flat is fixed and the barn is half way done being re-wired. Needless to say, that doesn’t leave me any time for brewing … sadly, I know.

Here are a few things to look forward to in the near future though …

-How to control japanese beetles on your grapes (video)

-Racking the Wee Heavy into a secondary

-Brewing up a batch of all grain Hefeweizen

-Much much more … (as always)

How to make a cheap mash tun

Posted in Beer on July 1st, 2011 by Chris

Alright, so I made a mash tun … I did a lot of searching on the internet for the simplest design to make and maintain. Unfortunately, I wasn’t happy with any of the designs out there so I took a stab at making my own.

There were two basic designs for “simple” mash tuns I found in my search.

1. Using a CPVC manifold and brass ball valve. This one seemed sturdy enough. I was hesitant though as it seems like it would be difficult to clean under the rigid CPVC manifold. Also, the brass valve cost more than the entirety of my design.

2. Using a stainless water supply line and an in-line valve. I like the idea of stainless since it’s inert but making it seemed more complicated (removing the inner tube from the drain line and replacing with a coiled wire for support). And, again …. I’m leery about how easy it is to clean. Yeah, I’m lazy and want to make everything easy ….

So, after a lot of thinking …. I thought I had it all figured out. Then I went to the hardware store and stood in the isle looking at all the fittings and had an epiphany. The result, I think you will find, is the cheapest and simplest mash tun design so far.

Parts

An old cooler (free is preferable)

5 ft of polyethelyne tubing

1 nylon barbed T fitting

Tools

A sharp knife

 

The process …. watch and see for yourself.

 

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